Barbecue Part I: spicy Korean pork spare ribs

May 19, 2008

Spicy Korean-style pork spare ribs and cool watermelon salad

 

My version of spare ribs are spicy and sweet, using Korean red pepper paste (gochu jang).  I measured out this recipe for the first time since I’ve always made this to taste, depending on how many ribs I was cooking.  This recipe should feed 4 very hungry people (or 6 people who had a snack before dinner).

Gochu jang is available at Korean and Asian grocery stores (and online, apparently).

 This red pepper paste is not for the weak-hearted.

 

Spicy Korean pork spare ribs

1/3 C. Korean red pepper paste (gochu jang)

2-3 cloves of garlic, minced

1/4 C. sugar (or less, depending on how sweet you like it)

3 Tbs. sesame seed oil

1/4 C. water

4-5 scallions cut into 3 inch long pieces

1 medium onion, sliced

2 Tbs. crushed toasted sesame seeds

4-5 lbs. pork spare ribs

toasted sesame seeds for garnish

 

Combine red pepper paste, garlic, sugar, sesame seed oil and water in a large bowl until smooth and runny. 

Add scallions, onions and crushed sesame seeds to mixture.  Add spare ribs and coat well. 

 Refigerate for at least a half hour (I like to put them in for an hour).  Heat up grill and cook on medium high, covered for about 6-8 minutes on each side, depending on your grill and the thickness of the ribs.  You can cook the onions and scallions on the grill (they will fall through unless you use a grill pan), or discard.  Sprinkle cooked ribs with sesame seeds, if desired.

 

 Serve with lots of moist towelettes.

 

***********************

Something this spicy must be served with something to cool the tongue, and this watermelon salad fits the bill.

Watermelon Salad

3 C. cubed watermelon

1 1/2 C. cherry tomatoes, halved

1/3 C. thinly sliced red onion

1 C. diced seedless cucumber, peeled

3 Tbs. lime juice

2 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

fresh ground pepper to taste

Combine watermelon, cherry tomatoes, red onions, cucumber, lime juice and olive oil in a large bowl.  Season with salt and pepper and toss lightly.  Cover and refrigerate for at least one hour.  Serve chilled.

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13 Responses to “Barbecue Part I: spicy Korean pork spare ribs”

  1. pookelo Says:

    I love Korean food…….and I love pork. What a great combo!! Can’t wait to try this!!

  2. EAT! Says:

    The Husband would love the spicy ribs. I have made a watermelon salad with fresh w/fresh basil and balsamic vinegar. I am going to give your recipe a try. Your photos are fantastic!

  3. chuck415 Says:

    I have a major craving for Korean BBQ now! Love the last direction on the ribs… ” Serve with lots of moist towelettes”

  4. bamamom1432 Says:

    I love spicy foods and being from the south ribs are a hit anytime. I cannot wait to try this


  5. Oh nooooo, i might have to make something yummy tonight. thanks for sharing such an awesome recipe.

  6. Kevin Says:

    Those spare ribs sound really tasty. Pairing them with the cool watermelon salad is perfect.

  7. HJ Says:

    What a great recipe!

    P.S. You have such a beautifully written blog. I can’t stop reading it. :)

  8. Garrett Says:

    Ohhh, now I have a huge craving from Korean BBQ…and it’s not even breakfast time yet!

  9. Mary Coleman Says:

    Perfect for the weekend. I’m doing your salad and your ribs for dinner Saturday night.
    Great blog!
    Mary

  10. PekoPeko Says:

    Korean red pepper paste rules! In Japan, Korean restaurants serve this dish called ika fei. It is squid sashimi with a mixture of veggies; greens, raw onions, sliced cucumbers and so on. It is all stirred together red pepper paste and served. It rules! Is that an authentic Korean dish, or something only in Japan?

    KyotoFoodieのPeko

  11. onespicymama Says:

    PekoPeko said,

    June 23, 2008 at 10:29 pm

    Korean red pepper paste rules! In Japan, Korean restaurants serve this dish called ika fei. It is squid sashimi with a mixture of veggies; greens, raw onions, sliced cucumbers and so on. It is all stirred together red pepper paste and served. It rules! Is that an authentic Korean dish, or something only in Japan?

    KyotoFoodieのPeko

    Yes, this squid is often serve with red pepper paste. It’s the real deal!

  12. underwritingsolutionsllc Says:

    Exactly how spicy is the Gochu jang? Hotter than jalapenos?

  13. onespicymama Says:

    underwritingsolutionsllc Says:
    July 2, 2008 at 3:55 pm
    Exactly how spicy is the Gochu jang? Hotter than jalapenos?

    Yes, generally hotter and sweeter.


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